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Returning the rātā to Wellington’s hills

Tanera Gully in Wellington is undergoing an urban restoration project with trees provided by Trees That Count and funded by Showcase Software.

Nestled in Aro Valley, Tanera Gully is surrounded by sports fields and houses. On the first Sunday of every month, The Tanera Gully Restoration Project team holds a regular working bee with the goal of returning the site’s biodiversity to what it would have looked like 170 years ago.

Trees That Count are helping the group to restore Tanera Gully’s crimson ridges and flanks, reflecting that northern rātā flourished in Wellington before 1840.

So far this year, we’ve provided the project with 416 native trees, funded into our marketplace by Showcase Software.

The group hopes a stream in the gully which has koura (freshwater crayfish) in it, and glowworms nearby, will one day become nature walk for local children to enjoy.

The project has been run by around 50 local volunteers for over 5 years, and they have no plans to slow down. You can keep up with their work on their Facebook page.

Trees That Count is New Zealand’s only community marketplace connecting native-tree planters with funders.  The conservation charity counts the number of native trees being planted by groups, individuals and agencies throughout the country, and helps increase this number by encouraging donations from business, philanthropy and the public. 

By counting the native trees planted, we can measure the collective impact on climate change and improve the environment. Since its launch in 2016, more than 18 million native trees have been added to the count, and more than 150,000 native trees funded.

Join us today by funding or planting native trees!


About the author

Trees That Count aims to create a national movement to plant millions of native trees to mitigate climate change. We're managed by the Project Crimson Trust in partnership with the Tindall Foundation.

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