Asset 3Asset 1Asset 2buildingcalendar-iconclockAsset 1Asset 1leaveslocation-markerAsset 1pure-advantageSearchAsset 1treetukutuku

Skip to the content

Restoration group turns coastal Northland hillside around

The Puke Kopipi Restoration Group have been working for 5 years to restore native trees to Puke Kopipi / Ngunguru Hill on the Tutukaka coastline in Northland. This year, Trees That Count gave them 500 trees towards their goal.

The group has created a new public walkway along the hill, and Robyn Skerten, from the Puke Kopipi Restoration Group, says “our mission for Puke Kopipi is to restore this important landscape feature for the Ngunguru Community. Our kaupapa is to protect the natural, cultural and historical values and to create a quiet place to walk and observe the special wairua.”

The trees were funded into our marketplace by Turners Car Auctions, and the planting day was held close to the Winter Solstice on June 23 on a beautiful warm day with views over Ngunguru Estuary and Sandspit / Pi Manu.

More working bee dates are planned in the coming months for wedding and maintenance. You can keep up with the volunteers on their Facebook group.

Trees That Count is New Zealand’s only community marketplace connecting native-tree planters with funders.  The conservation charity counts the number of native trees being planted by groups, individuals and agencies throughout the country, and helps increase this number by encouraging donations from business, philanthropy and the public. 

By counting the native trees planted, we can measure the collective impact on climate change and improve the environment. Since its launch in 2016, more than 18 million native trees have been added to the count, and more than 150,000 native trees funded.

Join us today by funding or planting native trees!


About the author

Trees That Count aims to create a national movement to plant millions of native trees to mitigate climate change. We're managed by the Project Crimson Trust in partnership with the Tindall Foundation.

comments powered by Disqus