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The Brookby Wildlife Habitat recovers from flood damage with community help

After flood damage, the Brookby Wildlife Habitat in Clevedon is back on its feet with help from Trees That Count.

The “Tasman Tempest” hit Clevedon in March 2017 and brought with it significant damage. The Auld sheep and cattle farm in Brookby, near Clevedon, was badly damaged, with significant slips and ongoing issues over the winter of 2017.

A contribution of 500 trees from Trees That Count, made possible by members of the public funding trees into our marketplace, are helping restore habitat in the Brookby Wildlife Habitat project.

Tha native regeneration project is supported by Auckland Council, Conservation Volunteers NZ, local schools and community groups. The trees were sourced from local Te Whangai Nursery in Pukekohe.

The project aims to regenerate native bush, link bush areas and improve the water quality of Papakura Stream. Long term, this will increase native wildlife and help sustain the abundant local birds, especially kererū and tūī who love the area.

Trees That Count is New Zealand’s only community marketplace connecting native-tree planters with funders.  The conservation charity counts the number of native trees being planted by groups, individuals and agencies throughout the country, and helps increase this number by encouraging donations from business, philanthropy and the public. 

By counting the native trees planted, we can measure the collective impact on climate change and improve the environment. Since its launch in 2016, more than 18 million native trees have been added to the count, and more than 150,000 native trees funded.

Join us today by funding or planting native trees!


About the author

Trees That Count aims to create a national movement to plant millions of native trees to mitigate climate change. We're managed by the Project Crimson Trust in partnership with the Tindall Foundation.

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