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About Trees That Count

Restoring our environment is a job for all of us

We’re building a picture of the planting efforts in New Zealand every year by counting the native trees which are planted by community groups, government agencies, schools and people in their own backyards. By doing this we can measure the collective impact of this work. But we need to help accelerate the rate of planting.

We are reaching out to all Kiwis to help grow the count. Get involved today.

Our journey

Trees That Count was born out of a simple question, "How many native trees are planted in New Zealand each year and could we plant more to help mitigate climate change?"

In November 2016, Trees That Count was launched. We're a programme of the Project Crimson Trust. For over 25 years, Project Crimson has been championing native tree planting through large-scale restoration and environmental education projects.

We're generously supported through the catalytic investment of The Tindall Foundation, in partnership with Department of Conservation and Pure Advantage.

More than 12 million trees have been added to the count, and through the support of public generosity and Kiwi businesses we're enabling conservation groups or landowners to plant more native trees.

The Trees That Count Marketplace

We’ve built New Zealand’s only community marketplace connecting native tree planters with funders.

So far we've worked with 37 groups to plant more than 100,000 native trees. Through these projects we are building partnerships, establishing monitoring systems, and working across a range of ecosystem and land ownership types. For us and our funders, it’s all about enabling more native trees to be planted. Check out all of these great stories of grass-roots conservation here.  

We’ve also developed useful resources for technical and planting advice and we're enabling Kiwis to donate or gift native trees.